Tag: Cricket

A Summer sport that originated in England, but is now played all over the world.

An Aussie Great: Sir Don Bradman


Biograph:

Donald George “Don” Bradman, AC, the youngest of 5 children, was born at a midwife’s home on 27 August 1908 at what we figure to be around 8pm in the evening in Cootamundra, New South Wales; his family home is now a state museum. . Throughout his career he was “The Don”, and widely acknowledged as the greatest batsman of all time. His career Test batting average of 99.94 is often cited as the greatest achievement by any sportsman in any sport.

He was married Jessie Martha Menzies at St Paul’s Anglican Church at Burwood, Sydney on 30 April 1932; they had 3 children.

Sir Donald had a meteoric rise from bush cricket to the Australian Test team in just a bit over two years. Before his 22nd birthday, he set several records for top scoring, some of which still stand, and became Australia’s sporting idol at the height of the Great Depression.  His stats actually could have been greater, but Australia interrupted the cricket for World War II.

Neither Alan Leo, Aleister Crowley nor Marc Edmund Jones covered his horoscope, unfortunately. We would like to correct that mistake now.

Bradman’s interception is in the 3rd and 9th

We have rectified Sir Donald to 01 Aries “a man rises out of the water, and a seal embraces him,” suggesting the soul’s interdependence between emotion and will as they create its new potential. His ascendant is closely tied to his Part of Fortune because success was so entwined into the fiber of his being, they could not separate. Bradman is a bucket with a Uranian handle at 13 Capricorn in the 10th house though Uranus is square the Lord, highlighting how he resented rules that he felt tied him down & yet lived a very domestic and quiet life.

He has a preponderance of planets in Virgo spreading from the 5th and the importance in his life on technique and perfect aim to the 6th where his scrupulous abstemious lifestyle led to a long life. He often claimed that his success was contingent on his wife, and she appears in the home’s 4th house where she managed everything and let him practise and perfect his skills. His North Node there shows how failure was an anathema to Bradman, and he hated to admit any personal shortcomings or familial problems like the illnesses of his children. This created some friction between himself and his father, who ultimately changed his surname to avoid the interrogating press.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard called him the “greatest living Australian” in 2001, shortly before he reposed. We can only agree, and say he was indeed a True Blue Aussie.


We constantly update and vet our posts for accuracy. This one was reviewed on Saturday, July 20 2019